The End.

by Awais Leghari

Going inside the examination hall for my physics exam still invoked fear. 40 marks could change everything, so an ox’s effort was required. Having not slept for the past 20 hours, the eye-lids were getting heavier as each second ticked by. Facing such adversities, I sat on my special Cambridge-provided wooden chair, which by the way, felt a little larger than usual – so that was another reason for feeling uncomfortable. And finally when the paper started, all other thoughts drifted into the background as I was battling the paradoxes involved in the study of matter.

The paper ended after an hour. Again, the thoughts that I gave space to weren’t bothering me anymore as they sat dormant in the background. The study of matter still itched a little, as I was a little confused over some of the answers, and the first thing I wanted to do was to confirm whether I had answered those questions correctly which I had doubts about. And then it struck me; A’levels, you’re gone, you live no more, you are a thing of the past. This thought wasn’t exactly happy, though, as it may seem.

Two years is a very long time period, specially in a momentous life of an A’levels student. Now, I was saying goodbye to a period I will never forget. The two years I’ve spent here in Lahore Grammar School Johar Town were the best years of my life so far. So much ups and downs, so much drama and so much to learn from when you look back at yourself.

I was the master of procrastination when A’levels started. Sitting in long classes while the teachers so devotedly talk about whatever they’re good at, I couldn’t bear the ambiance inside while so much was going on outside of the classroom. I thought I could bunk classes, and boy, did I learn a lesson from doing that. “Bio is easy as hot cake”, relying on this argument, I bunked the Biology class. Next day, a Rs. 500 fine and a death letter landed in my house’s mailbox. That day, my face was a little larger than it usually is.

On a more personal note, the A’levels was like a breath of fresh air. New friends to make, new people, new teachers, new rules – basically new everything.

And now, I sit at another crossroad where I face a similar situation. But what hurts the most is that I won’t be there to spend some good time with the friends I had in my A’levels, the friends that are so close to me. Sad.

And then I strolled outside to find that the whole world was a little different. Deafening cheers greeted my ears as my peers celebrated the end of it all. The air was a little different too – with every breath, my eye-lids defied sleep, and my body secreted adrenaline. I could feel the sense of freedom that I had lost a few months ago. I was free. And then it struck again – “THIS IS THE END”

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